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Expeditions are journeys with purpose. Published in Queens, New York.


Current Issue: Homecoming

This issue (buy here) is about Homecoming: how we design for our home, how we react to our daily comings and going, and how might we create a better native place for ourselves.

It’s a great issue.

This issue is all about how we affect our native place. D.J. Trischler speaks about Neighborhood-Centered Design, Lisa Dewey-Mattia shares her Kindergarten Commute, Marguerite Jones talks about her Metamorphosis to music, Alison Waske Sutter is interviewed about how she is helping Grand Rapids become more resilient, we share a deep dive into 5g Antennas and a provocation about how to re-wild where we grew up.

Please feel free to purchase a copy while supplies last. Your purchase helps support future issues through cash infusion, and by showing people care about this project.


Podcast

Listen to our ever-evolving podcast, here’s our most recent episode.

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Feed


Expedition Works

A full–service design cooperative – let’s work together to make your journey with a purpose successful.

Avery’s Journey

Exploring Avery’s journey designing for the new district, with an assist from MidJourney.



Previous Issue: Scorching

This issue (buy here) is about Scorching: what happens when things get out of hand, it’s hot out, and the heat doesn’t go away? How are we responding to this slowly rising catastrophe? We speak to a range of people who are working to make our neighborhoods more resilient

We spoke with Annika Lundkvist who is creating a network of practitioners at Pedestrian Space; architect Jan Kattein who is creating Temporary urbanism for a contingent community; Eric Paul Dennis writes about how Trees are Critical Infrastructure; Jason Baker, a robot, and myself wrote a poem; and we share another Tactical Democracy dispatch: Engagement Spectrum Toolkit and share The Bowerbird.

Please feel free to purchase a copy while supplies last. Your purchase helps support future issues through cash infusion, and by showing people care about this project.

Articles from this issue

First Issue: Founding

This issue is about Founding: the beginning of new things, work, and art. Our inaugural issue is our first prototype in using print pamphleteering to create narrative.

Jason Baker wrote a poem about a village, we speak with Lara Storm & Ben Swire about their company Make Believe Works, we share two features about Tactical Democracy: an introduction, and how we used Block Builder to help people’s inner voice come to life.

Please feel free to purchase a copy while supplies last. Your purchase helps support future issues through cash infusion, and by showing people care about this project.

Articles from this issue


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Notes

Constructed Authenticity at the Ohio Village

Imagine speeding along the interstate, catching a fleeting glimpse of a quaint village green where a baseball game is being played under the summer sun. Nestled in Columbus, Ohio, this isn’t just any village—it’s Ohio Village, a meticulously constructed historical town where the past comes to life. From Victorian parlors to Civil War-era baseball games, and from turn-of-the-century bakers to suffragists rallying for the vote, Ohio Village offers an immersive journey through time. Join us as we explore the stories, challenges, and triumphs of creating and maintaining this living history museum with Andrew Hall, the mastermind behind its educational programming.




Sponsored by:

Expedition Works

Hi. We’re a full–service design cooperative – let’s work together to make your journey with a purpose successful.


Show notes & links


Suggested Episodes

Farnsworth House, Telling the whole story

Dive into the world of Midcentury Modern architecture with the first episode of our two-part series, exploring the iconic Dr. Edith Farnsworth House by Mies van der Rohe. This episode unravels the complex story behind the creation of this architectural masterpiece, from Mies’s dramatic departure from Nazi Germany, leaving behind his family, to the protracted design and construction process that eventually led to a notorious lawsuit and rumors of a romantic entanglement with Dr. Farnsworth—rumors that bear no resemblance to the truth.

Glass House: A Warped Mirror

We explore the life and legacy of Philip Johnson through his iconic Glass House. Delving into Johnson’s multifaceted career, we reflect on Johnson’s profound impact on modern architecture, his controversial political past, and how these facets interplay with his architectural legacy. This episode navigates the complexities of his contributions within the context of his support of fascists, anti-semites, and the Nazi Party. Highlighting the Glass House’s design and significance, we reflect on how to view Johnson’s work in the context of his personal history, emphasizing the importance of learning from the past to inform our understanding of architecture and history.


Guest Bio

Andrew Hall is the manager of Ohio Village’s educational programming at the Ohio History Connection in Columbus, Ohio. With a focus on planning and executing a wide range of educational content, Andrew ensures that both day-to-day visitors and large public events, like the annual July 4th celebration, are engaging and informative. Under his leadership, Ohio Village offers a unique living history experience, showcasing different time periods and evolving stories that reflect the diverse history of Ohio. Passionate about authenticity and community involvement, Andrew collaborates with dedicated volunteers and local community members to bring a variety of perspectives to the forefront, making Ohio Village a vibrant and dynamic resource for all who visit.

“Ohio village is this really great community space. That is a great example of what living history can and what I think should be. Ohio Village just being what it is gives us a chance to create this really fascinating cross section of individuals that then creates this great framework by which we can share all these stories.”

Avery §d7B32 – BR-723B

In the 8th episode, Avery uncovers the truth about the BR-723B with the help of Paulina, Central, and elevated status.


About

Avery’s Transmissions are a collection of episodic narratives exploring a near-future designer’s experience designing objects for their neighborhood. Designed in collaboration with various ML, LLM’s, and generative software this is an ongoing experiment with paired design and narrative.




Sponsored by:

Expedition Works

Hi. We’re a full–service design cooperative – let’s work together to make your journey with a purpose successful.


City Hall Deliverista mobility hub: Man Man & Gustavo

We take a deep dive into the future of urban mobility, focusing on a groundbreaking initiative to support e-bike delivery workers and the public in New York City through a new Mobility Hub next to City Hall, with battery recharging, repair, and rest areas.

Disclosure: We own common stock in Oonee through Republic Investors because we believe in non-car mobility. The purchase was made two (2) years ago. When setting up this interview, we did not know that Oonee and Fantástica were run by the same principals.



Show notes & links


Sponsored by:

Expedition Works

Hi. We’re a full–service design cooperative – let’s work together to make your journey with a purpose successful.



Episode Overview

Top Themes

  1. Lack of Safe Charging Locations: Currently, delivery workers face challenges in finding safe locations to charge their e-bike batteries, often resorting to unsafe practices.
  2. Proposal for a Bike Hub: The proposed bike hub will provide secure, safe, and accessible charging stations for e-bike batteries, helping delivery workers and the public. The hub will include state-of-the-art facilities for quick bike tune-ups, battery charging, and assistance from staff. It will be a community resource open to everyone.
  3. Community Impact: The hub aims to serve not just delivery workers but the entire community, offering a space for bike parking, repairs, and charging.
  4. Urban Mobility and Infrastructure: The need for new infrastructure to support the growing use of micro-mobility devices like e-bikes in urban environments.
  5. Safety and Accessibility: Ensuring that new mobility solutions are safe, accessible, and meet the needs of diverse users, particularly vulnerable groups like delivery workers. Adapting existing technologies and creating new solutions to meet the specific needs of users, such as customized charging cabinets for different types of e-bike batteries.
  6. Public and Private Collaboration: The importance of collaboration between public entities (like the parks department and landmarks department) and private companies (like Oonee) to create effective urban solutions.
  7. Future of Urban Spaces: Reimagining and repurposing existing urban spaces (like old newspaper stands) to meet current and future mobility needs.

Guest Bio: J. Manuel Mansylla (manman)

J. Manuel Mansylla (manman) founded design studio  FANTÁSTICA in 2008 specializing in transformative projects to revitalize underutilized assets and unlock economic potential.

As an urban designer at the forefront of a trend to create effective public spaces through rapid, agile transformation, he rose to early success in his home country of Guatemala, where he was tapped to lead an innovative project to revitalize a neglected area of Guatemala City into a contemporary art and tech hub. Working together with both the public and private sector in the creation of the region’s first “special districts,” the project helped transform the area’s brand identity, land use, and public space strategy. Today, Cuatro Grados Norte, is one of the most vibrant destinations in the country, and has one of the highest concentrations of new buildings going up in all of Guatemala City.

“The idea of a mobility hub is still not clear in people’s mind, but if we think about the turn of the century when cars started popping up and there were no gas stations, we’re in the midst of a micro-mobility revolution, and yet there’s no service stations for all of these devices.”

Avery §g6BFn – The Crosswalk

Grappling with the challenge of integrating advanced technology into a historically sensitive area, a new walk sign indicator frustrates both the machine and Avery. It’s an irony of the excesses of the project requirements and necessary sensors to keep cars from killing people.




Sponsored by:

Expedition Works

Hi. We’re a full–service design cooperative – let’s work together to make your journey with a purpose successful.


Avery §3v28f – The Light

As daylight fades, Avery navigates the intricacies of urban innovation and workplace politics, crafting a dual-design traffic light system for a district straddling tradition and autonomy




Sponsored by:

Expedition Works

Hi. We’re a full–service design cooperative – let’s work together to make your journey with a purpose successful.


Avery §J4dz8: The Hydrant

The bid process was new, but the boomerang project was the type of high risk and high reward Avery was trained to tackle. Caution was prudent, but sometimes boredom pushes us to extremes.




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From Placemaking to Placekeeping: Redefining Urban Spaces with Alexa Gonzalez

Alexa Gonzalez shifts urban design from placemaking to placekeeping, emphasizing community voices and long-term engagement to reshape public spaces in ways that truly reflect and benefit those who use them.



This episode pairs well with…

Joanne Cheung – Cities Book of Play

Cities are sites of aspirations and identities, and ‘play’ can be a means for fostering community engagement. Architect and urbanist Joanne Cheung critiques the prevailing forms of community engagement, suggesting that they are often paternalistic and fail to adequately consider the agency of individuals and communities.

Listen now


Episode Overview

  1. Distinction between Placemaking and Placekeeping: Alexa emphasizes the importance of “placekeeping” over “placemaking,” arguing that the latter often disregards existing community values and can act as a vehicle for gentrification.
  2. Community-Centric Approach: The focus is on amplifying local artists, businesses, and stories, fostering a deeper connection with the existing community rather than imposing new ideas.
  3. Multi-Generational Engagement: Placekeeping encourages activities that engage multiple generations, sharing knowledge and experiences within the community.
  4. Overcoming Trust Barriers: Building trust in communities, particularly BIPOC communities, is crucial due to historical disenfranchisement and skepticism towards development projects.
  5. Interactive and Fun Engagement: Alexa’s approach to community engagement emphasizes making participation enjoyable and interactive, which helps lower barriers and fosters more genuine connections.
  6. Use of Creative Tools: Tools like “Programming Tiles” help community members visualize potential changes in their environment, assisting them in articulating their needs and desires for public spaces.
  7. Education and Shared Decision-Making: It’s essential to educate the community about the potential long-term benefits of urban design projects to foster informed decision-making.
  8. Importance of Representation: Ensuring that public spaces reflect the diversity of the community, including all ages, abilities, and racial backgrounds.
  9. Navigating Systemic Challenges: Recognizing that public space projects are part of larger systemic frameworks, which often reflect existing power dynamics rather than the collective good.
  10. Sustainable Community Relationships: Long-term success in placekeeping requires ongoing efforts to maintain relationships within the community, understanding their evolving needs and respecting their historical context.

Sponsored by:

Expedition Works

Hi. We’re a full–service design cooperative – let’s work together to make your journey with a purpose successful.


About the Avery Transmissions

Stepping back and breaking the fourth wall, I wanted to share some thoughts on the Avery transmissions which I’ve been dropping in my podcast amongst the more “regular” interview episodes. You can listen to the Avery-specific episodes here:

These started as design fiction-adjacent musings on what street furniture might look like in the near future in collaboration with MidJourney so I could stay aware of what’s happening in the image generation space. These really weren’t true design fictions as they weren’t embodied, so they were more speculative design using fiction and images to paint vignettes.

I’ve done a bunch of vignettes which I would post amongst the various social spaces, and they live here:

I became inspired by what Julian Bleecker was doing with AI-generated poems converted to audio/video to create…things:

And Drew Wiberg was playing around with using AI created voices, poems, and narratives with Gnome School, a futurist narrative for progressive animists, mystics, and conjurers that imagines into possible worlds where chaos magic, near-future technology, design fiction, mycology and solarpunk utopian aspirations converge.

I realized that Descript’s built-in AI voices were becoming…passable as I was editing the more normie interview episodes. Then Julian shared with me this PBS Newshour segment on podcasting, with a bit of a challenge to get “weird” with things.

As I had an existing corpus of text and images and a place to put them, I figured…why not get a little weird with it?

So I started to publish the normie episodes of the podcast on Tuesdays/Wednesdays and the Avery episodes on Thursday. Without warning or preamble.

I’m…not sure they are good or interesting to anyone else, but to me I love the challenge of how to make a standalone narrative in three or less minutes, using a very limited set of tooling. I’m restricting myself to Descript-based AI voices, MidJourney for image generation, and when I have to summarize things I use OpenAi Chat GPT-4. There are higher fidelity tooling out there which I’m aware of, but I’m not willing to spend the time learning for something like this. Someday. But without these tools I wouldn’t be able to make this…whatever it is. I don’t think it’s art, more just sketching into the future.

So.

I *think* I’m going to continue to explore this space and publish more transmissions. These episodes are fairly lightweight to produce, and they scratch an itch around narrative, storytelling, and exploration into the different generating tools we have right now. And I already have about 20 written, so it is a nice forcing function to keep me moving on the more normie episodes.

The episodes are also short, so I don’t mind if people skip them, and I haven’t seen any drop-off in downloads and subscriptions the last three weeks.

You can listen to most of the current Avery transmissions here:


TYPOLOGY.CITY

Where public policy meets our bodies.

  • A fond farewell to the Downtown Alliance composting bin pilot, where the bins collected 105,157 pounds of organic waste over 18 months. The post Farewell Composting Pilot, hello DSNY composting bins appeared first on Typology City.
  • These photos come via Cary Westerbeck of the Portland Loo installatioin at the at Feriton Spur park in Kirkland, WA. The post Portland Loo appeared first on Typology City.

About

Hi. My name is Randy. Nice to meet you.

I’m a design and innovation consultant which owns Expedition Works. I specialize in solving hard and complex problems for people in elegant, and hopefully simpler ways. Depending on the problem need, this might look like user and customer experience design, product and interaction design, service design, strategy, or environments design.

I consult and advise, having worked with a wide roster of organizations after leaving IDEO after 12 years of exciting work. Prior to this, I worked as an architect in NYC, for 8 years.

I’ve done extensive work in the public sector working with great partners from the Knight Foundation to reimagine the civic commons across eight cities, Bloomberg Philanthropies to cultivate city-based innovation in the U.S. and India, AARP to evolve their role in creating livable communities for all, and the City of Los Angeles and NYCHA to make cities better through design.

I’ve also completed a range of new products and services with a diverse set of clients—including State Farm, Steelcase, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Tata, Citibank, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories, and Walgreens—on a variety of design challenges, from new digital communication tools, to blended digital and physical experiences, to entirely new retail strategy and concepts.

Holding a BS in Architecture and Masters of Architecture from the University of Cincinnati, I’ve worked worldwide for firms large and small. I have extensively taught in the past, most notably as a Part-time Studio Lecturer at Parsons the New School, and an Adjunct Assistant Professor at NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service.